Reflection on Assignment 4

I have produced a tight series of diptychs for my fourth Assignment for Body of Work. I feel the images work best as standalone diptych. The series of diptychs make a cohesive whole with two clear themes present. The first theme is change in Deptford and touches upon the regeneration going on there. As I’ve discovered, this change is symptomatic of change in many other places in London and wider elsewhere and so speaks for change in a larger scheme of things. The second theme is deconstructing the decisive moment through the use of composites within the diptychs. I experimented with this theme during Assignment 3 and have developed it since to fill out the body of work. Therefore my practice leading up to Assignment 4 has been a continuation of where I was going since Assignment 3 with a clear strategy now employed.

Assignment 4 – Body of Work – Reconstructing Deptford

Place and its people are a central aspect of how my project Reconstructing Deptford started and how it has progressed. I have deliberately put place first because it was the primary consideration for me as I began. Now, I consider people to be the thing the holds a place like Deptford together, with the setting they find themselves in the backdrop. Regeneration of a place that is close to my heart is of interest to me. Showing the people within the diptychs to be similar in one way yet different in another backs up my assertion that people in the regenerated setting are an important part of Deptford too.

Fellow Students’ Feedback on My Body of Work Project So Far

I requested feedback off my fellow students doing my module and other artists as well. I got some responses and have recorded them below along with my thoughts on each student/artists feedback. Doing this has allowed me to pause and reflect on where my project is going. It has also allowed me to see what others see when they're looking with fresh eyes and from another perspective at the diptychs.

Showing Not Telling – Text and Image to Form Diegesis

Kris Belden-Adams in Beyond "This-Caused-That”: The Temporal Complexities of Before-and-After Photographs (2017) re-articulates the account of how a diegesis works in a comic strip in Barthes' Rhetoric of the Image (1964). When both text and photographs supplement each other under the same idea, a diegesis is formed (Belden-Adams, 2017). A diegesis is a kind of overall narrative consisting of the like-minded fragments that make it up.